Old field-names

January 27, 2015

Old Field Names
Champs Close (Peachcroft) This is an old field-name, possibly derived from the French ‘champs’ meaning ‘a field’.
Old Field Names
Chandlers Close (Peachcroft) Named after a field-name on the Radley Parish Tithe Map.
Old Field Names
Charney Close (Peachcroft) This is also called after an old field-name in Radley Parish.
Old Field Names
Corn Avil Close (Peachcroft) This is an old field-name in the Parish of Radley.

Thanks to ‘The Origins of the Street Names of Abingdon’ by John McGowan 1988. It needs to be updated and brought back into print.

Filed under: heritage

3 Comments Leave a Comment

  • 1. Angela  |  January 28, 2015 at 12:28 pm

    Thanks for the information, really interesting. I knew the land used to be in Radley Parish but hadnt twigged the street names

  • 2. RHC  |  January 29, 2015 at 3:03 am

    From the book published by Radley History Club but now unfortunately out of print.

    Champs Close was a small field where Spinney’s Close now stands in Radley. It is on the 1633 Terrier of Radley and stretched to where the houses in Lower Radley to the left after the railway bridge are now.

    The Radley tithe map of 1849 shows Chandlers as a two-acre field where Radley Station, Lower Radley Caravan Park and Shaws Copse are not situated.

    Charney means an island in the River Cearn, which is an alternative name for the River Ock, according to Wikipedia. Radley parish council when naming the roads suggested it was an old field name.

    The verb to avill or havel means to divided the husk from the grain although there are other meanings attached to it. Corn Avill Field which was situated opposite Lower Farm in Radley was owned by the Blacknall Trust at one time and tithes were paid to them. In 1633 the field was known as Corn Avile and in 1889 there was a field, which was part of Neat Home Farm, of 45 acres, called Corn Havell.

  • 3. Anne and Peter  |  January 30, 2015 at 6:02 pm

    The updating of John McGowan`s book would be such a useful and personally satisfying project for someone interested in our local history. We still have our copy – fascinating – and a real labour of love.

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