Filed under: obituaries

Thames Valley Police Flag is flying at half mast

Openings and Closings on the High Street
Above the County Hall, in Abingdon, the Thames Valley Police Flag is flying at half mast.

PC Harper, based at Abingdon Police Station, and part of a rapid response operation, was killed last Thursday, attending a suspected burglary between Reading and Newbury.

4 Comments August 21, 2019

Pastor Ed Evans

Pastor Ed Evans
At Trinity Church on Sunday we were all shocked to hear that Pastor Ed Evans is no longer with us, following a heart attack.

There was a time of silence in the service on Sunday Morning. It was probably the same in all the churches. Ed was well known as he chaired the Church in Abingdon.

At Trinity, Revd. Ian Griffiths prayed for Ed’s young family, and the Community Church – that Ed has led for many years, and everybody who has been close to Ed. He has been leading and helping so many community groups. His loss will be felt by many. I knew him as a Governor at Thameside School, where he also took assemblies, organised the wonderful prayer spaces that came to school, and helped with after school clubs.

Revd Ian said that Ed believed that there was more than this life. There is also life with God. God has prepared a place for Ed, and we sang the King of Love my Shepherd is which took me back to the memory of Diana Skellington and my first ever blog post – from January 2003.

In death’s dark vale I fear no ill
With Thee, dear Lord, beside me;
Thy rod and staff my comfort still,
Thy Cross before to guide me.

4 Comments July 22, 2019

Abingdon Town Mace in Black

Abingdon Town Mace
At St Helen’s Church this afternoon the Abingdon Town Mace was there at the Mayor’s pew. The Mace was draped in black for the Service of Thanksgiving for the life of Audrey Hasnip, the Mayor in 1999-2000.

Her husband, Keith Hasnip, had a similar service almost six years ago. He had also been Mayor.

Both services began with the hymn Praise, my soul, the King of Heaven and ended with the hymn Lord of all Hopefulness. Both services asked for donations for the NSPCC, and at both Reverend Dr Charles Miller officiated.

Reverend Charles gave a sermon for Keith’s service, but at Audrey’s service there was no sermon. Instead there were a lot of family tributes. There were also readings from The Wind in the Willows, Harry Potter, and Winnie-the-Pooh.

Regarding the Great Mace, Charles II’s restoration was in 1660, and from that date maces had to have the Royal Emblem again. During Cromwell’s time they bore the emblem of the House of Commons. An inscription at the base says “John Mayott, Gentleman, Mayor when this Mace was made for ye Corporation of Abingdon in ye County of Berks …” John Mayott was Mayor in 1651-1652 as well as 1659-1660. So 1660 could be when the mace was made, or remade with the Royal Emblem. (details from Abingdon and its treasures -1956)

Leave a Comment June 11, 2019

Audrey Hasnip

Audrey Hasnip
Audrey Hasnip, the Mayor of Abingdon from 1999-2000, died a couple of days ago. We lost her husband, Keith, also a former Mayor of Abingdon, a few years ago.

They were both former school teachers. Audrey taught at St Helen’s School. Keith taught languages at Abingdon School. They also served as House Parents at Waste Court boarding house at Abingdon School. It was in their retirement that they got involved in local politics.

Audrey was a lovely lady and was there helping at Mother and Toddler group at St Helen’s Church when our children were young. She also sang in the choir at St Helen’s Church.
Audrey Hasnip
Audrey drew beautifully. She drew the little buildings on a town map that is still used. She also designed and edited a book about Abingdon called Cameos of Abingdon – celebrating Abingdon’s 450th Charter year in 2006. Keith and Audrey used to organise Heritage Open Day and had a great interest in all aspects of the town. All our sympathy to Audrey’s family.

1 Comment May 15, 2019

Ruth Baker

Ruth Baker
On Saturday there was the funeral of Ruth Baker, a well known lady in the Church in Abingdon (CiA). She had often represented the Society of Friends, or ‘Quakers’ at CiA events, and on numerous charities.

The South Oxfordshire Crematorium had room for about 100 people but that was not enough as people were crammed into the lobby. The Quaker style funeral began with a short introduction, to explain that there would be times of quiet, and that anybody who felt moved could stand up and say some words.

A lot of people did contribute. Her grand children told how she always gave them her full attention, listened to whatever their concerns were, and was always there with wise words. Other people told how she brought people together in lots of ways and was always so welcoming and loving. What I did not realise was that she was a Doctor, having gained a PhD at Oxford – that was after getting a 1st class degree in the infant science of Biochemistry at Oxford. At that time however, she decided to dedicate her time to bringing up her children, rather than following a scientific career.

The funeral details can be seen at the Tonks Brothers website. There is also a link to make donations to Ruth’s charities, and a link to the webcast for anybody who could not get to the funeral – and wish they had, or could not hear from the lobby.

The picture is from this blog in 2007. Anybody who wants to find out more abut the Quakers and their unique style of silent worship can join a small group on Thursday evening at St Ethelwold’s House.

1 Comment January 21, 2019

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